How to Lead into Uncertainty

How to Lead into Uncertainty

Coach-on-Demand Podcasts™

with Gregory A. Ketchum, Ph.D.

Featuring Bobbie LaPorte

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How to Lead into Uncertainty

– 13 min –

 

Uncertainty has always been a part of our world, but with Covid 19 and all the disruptions it has caused it looks like uncertainty is now a permanent, unrelenting worldwide fixture rather than something that happens in response to a particular crisis and then recedes.

Despite how much we may dislike uncertainty, learning how to not only accept, but truly embrace it and the new possibilities it brings is one of those fundamental leadership skills for our time. If you’d like to learn how to make this leadership switch, have a listen to this interview with executive coach, leadership consultant and six-time Ironman triathlon finisher Bobbie LaPorte.

Roberta A. LaPorte, Organizational Consultant

After spending 25 years leading Fortune 50 organizations and technology start-ups, Bobbie draws on positive psychology and her experience as a six-time Ironman triathlons finisher to help organizations navigate uncertainty and get ready for anything. Learn more »

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Committing to a Strong DEI Statement

Committing to a Strong DEI Statement

Committing to a Strong DEI Statement

Part 2 of 3

– 4 min –

 

In my last blog, I talked about the difference between making statements about change and actually making a true and deep commitment to implement changes.

The most important element of a good DEI statement is committing to the difficult and unending work of embedding equity into every aspect of your workplace. Your DEI statement is useless if you’re not totally committed to implementing the changes.

With that goal in mind, I list below the elements I like to see in a solid DEI statement.

1. Commitment. I can’t repeat this often enough — you’ve made a true commitment to embed equity into your workplace and you mean it.

2. Acknowledgement. Your statement acknowledges the hard truths. Specifically, you should name how injustice and inequity have taken shape in your specific industry and, even more courageously, in your specific workplace and institution. [eg. College Spring]

3. Connection. You explicitly connect your workplace values and beliefs to the statement. If you have a value or a belief that is human-centered (e.g. teamwork, unity, being stronger together, doing the right thing), you can tie that value directly to your DEI efforts. Any new initiatives are simply another way that you are exercising that particular value. [eg. RWJF]

4. Vision. We need to be visionary because we are co-creating a new reality, one that doesn’t yet exist. adrienne maree brown, author, amazing human and more, talks about how this exercise is akin to creating science fiction — we are envisioning a future that doesn’t exist and are working to make it so. Boldly envision going where we haven’t been and doing your part as a workplace to push us all towards that vision, towards being better.

5. Transparency. Share specific activities and goals. Discrimination, bias, and inequity thrive in the dark. Be transparent! Your statement should include information about where you are, where you hope to be specifically, and what you’re doing to get there. If you’ve completed a belonging survey where you’ve got a result that is representative of where you are (e.g. a 73% favorability score, or a gap of up to 20 points between your dominant group and a non-dominant group), share that. Share targets such as aiming to close that gap within a certain timeframe and share what you are doing to address that gap. Be transparent about your numbers, strategies, and what they’re doing to bring your vision to fruition. [eg. Loom, HubSpot]

6. Stance. Communicate a stance, not just a statement. Workplace equity is not a project or initiative, it is an ongoing and iterative engine that will be key to the success of workplaces of the future. Some statements can come across as very static. I appreciate statements that come across more like a stance. A stance is more complex and dynamic. It sends a message that you’re taking stock of the situation continually and shifting to address issues as we go along. It sends a message that you’re going to continue to work hard to address the problem of inequity and injustice wherever you find yourself as an institution. A stance communicates a message of humility that whatever you know today, you will know more tomorrow — and therefore, you will evolve to meet the needs and challenges that present tomorrow. We are not solving all the -isms that have been socialized and embedded in us for hundreds of years by Q3 of 2027 or whatever. We are communicating our stance in a humble and committed way.

7. ​Commitment.​ Oh wait, I said that already! But I’m saying it again just in case some of you didn’t hear me the first couple of times! You’ve made a true commitment and you mean it. You’re not just going to talk about making changes — you’re going to actually do the work to make workplace equity happen.

In my next blog, I’ll talk about what I think the word ‘commitment’ really means, as I’ve come to realize that the word doesn’t mean the same thing to all of us.

 

Olanike Ayomide-Mensah, CEO, Mosaic Consulting

Olanike is a strategist and executor rolled into one, experienced in applying the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) lens to all aspects of workplace management and at any stage of DEI development. Her 20+ years of experience spans corporate and non-profit organizations operating at local, national, and international levels. Learn more »

 

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Leadership Skills & Personal Energy

Leadership Skills & Personal Energy

ZoeRouth Podcast

with Zoë Routh

Featuring Ginny Whitelaw

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Leadership Skills & Personal Energy

– 42 min –

Leadership strengths are best when we lead through effortless effort.

What leadership skills do you get when you cross a NASA scientist with a Zen Master? Amazing, novel strategies for better leadership effectiveness. Ginny Whitelaw is a remarkable human being with fabulous insights from her latest book, Resonate: Zen and the Way of Making a Difference.

Leadership responsibilities start with the self first:

  • How the human body is an energetic instrument of leadership effectiveness
  • Using the breath as the first step to deep resonance and leadership empathy
  • Wu Way: the path of effortless effort – a peaceful leadership framework

We explore leadership principles founded in Zen and energy practice:

  • How actions feed the field of energy and are critical for leadership effectiveness
  • How to take action regardless of one’s own personal resistance and struggle
  • How to be a big change agent: a practical leadership model
  •  

Ginny Whitelaw, Author & CEO, Institute for Zen Leadership

A biophysicist and former senior manager for integrating NASA’s International Space Station, Dr. Whitelaw has trained leaders on the path of making a difference for more than 25 years, working with mind, body, energy and resonance through the Institute for Zen Leadership. Learn more »

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Resonate

Expect to be surprised by the joy, resilience and “effortless effort” of working with resonance in real-life applications from a challenge you’re facing, to strengthening a relationship, to leading change in a team or system.

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B.O.S.S. Employees for Positive Motivation

B.O.S.S. Employees for Positive Motivation

B.O.S.S. Employees for Positive Motivation

– 3 min –

 

A recent Florida State study found that 40% of people have experienced “bad bosses”. Top-culprit behaviors include undermining and dispiriting conduct such as failing to give credit, intimidating employees with the silent treatment, and making negative comments. The University of Minnesota researchers surprisingly found that the biggest turnover occurred in employees who had positive views of themselves but felt undermined and stressed. Ironically, employers were losing their best team members and producers.

How can “good bosses” reinforce high self-esteem and positive work motivation? Common knowledge points to positive recognition being key for engagement, high performance, and retention motivation in the work environment. Gallup reported only 33% of employees felt fully engaged, with lack of recognition being the #1 reason for people quitting their jobs. O.C. Tanner research reported that 60% of respondents were more motivated by recognition than money but that 82% felt their supervisors don’t recognize their accomplishments.

Beyond positive recognition, we also need to encourage employees through high, positive expectations. Offering others our encouragement is a noble act as a leader, manager, or colleague. “Encouragement” comes from the Latin word cour, meaning “heart”. To encourage literally gives “heart” to employees if they are hurting, in a slump, lacking confidence, facing a job adversity or other barriers they’re not sure they can overcome.

The power of encouragement and expressing positive belief in someone is undeniable. Psychologists say its magic is in the phenomenon called “self-fulfilling prophecy”. In the classic education study “Pygmalion in the Classroom”, researchers told teachers that certain randomly selected children would be “spurters” (based on a non-existent Harvard test) –– in other words, late bloomers who would make tremendous academic and intellectual strides by year’s end. Sure enough, they excelled more than could be expected by chance, due to their teachers’ belief in them. The movie King Richard portrays how parental belief and high, positive expectations (along with dedicated training) helped the Williams sisters become tennis champions. Medicine’s cancer treatment now includes positive expectations and visualizing positive results.

In business, managers can pour psychological vitamins into the emotional and self-motivational lives of employees, especially if they’re discouraged, afraid to risk a new undertaking, or lack belief in their capabilities.

This is where B.O.S.S. comes in. Let’s B.O.S.S. people around(!) by expressing high, positive expectations with this simple encouragement formula:

“B” stands for directly expressing your Belief: “Monica, you’ve done incoming customer service for three years. I believe you have what it takes to shift into outbound sales. It’ll earn you far more money, provide job variety, and give you freedom out in the field.”

“O” stands for Obstacles –– acknowledging the challenges of what you’re psyching someone up to tackle, rather than pretending it’ll be a cake-walk. You don’t set someone up when you B.O.S.S. them: “Monica, I’m not saying it’ll be easy transitioning to selling. It’ll require learning a lot more product knowledge as well as handling tough objections.”

The “S” and “S” in the B.O.S.S. acronym stand for Specific Strengths. Describe the exact, specific strengths you’ve observed in your employee that lead you to have confidence in the person’s ability to overcome the obstacles you’ve discussed: “Monica, I truly believe you have what it takes to gain any new product knowledge. I saw you learn the new computer system faster than anyone else. I see you effectively manage objections and upset every day in customer service. You’re the one who handles escalations if I’m traveling. I know you’ll be a fantastic outbound salesperson.”

These B.O.S.S. steps will empower you to kindle the motivation spark in your colleagues and those who directly report to you. Do you know someone who is starving for encouragement that they receive too rarely, or maybe never, in their lives? Start encouraging your employees by B.O.S.S.ing them around! Encouragement is your superpower for making someone’s day.

Rick Brandon, Ph. D.,, Author & CEO of Brandon Partners

Rick Brandon offers flagship workshops on Organizational Savvy and Interpersonal Savvy. His new book is Straight Talk: Influencing Skills for Collaboration and Commitment which comes after his Wall Street Journal bestselling Survival of the Savvy: High-Integrity Political Tactics for Career and Company Success. With thirty years of performance improvement experience, Rick has trained tens of thousands at companies worldwide, including scores of Fortune 500 companies. He is married and lives in Mill Valley, CA, where he also plays TAPS for veterans’ funerals and fronts an R&B cover band.

 

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What are the Elements of a Strong DEI Statement?

What are the Elements of a Strong DEI Statement?

What are the Elements of a Strong DEI Statement?

Part 1 of 3

– 2 min –

 

When workplaces decide to take on diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) work, they have leadership-level conversations about what they’re going to do and why they’re doing it. Those conversations often lead to a desire to put a statement together that articulates their DEI approach and what they hope to achieve.

Many of these conversations took place in 2020 — the year we all witnessed a global uprising in support of Black Lives Matter, after the murder of George Floyd.

As this movement took hold in the workplace, I saw two distinct scenarios taking place and I spoke about them during a digital panel discussion in the video clip below.

Some workplaces went about the task of making statements about change, while others made true commitments to implement changes – two very different things!

Fast forward to two years later, and we now see what happens when statements aren’t backed with true commitment. Too many of those promises have fallen flat. This is disheartening for those of us who care so deeply about these issues — issues that directly impact so many of us daily.

I still get asked what makes a good DEI statement. The question bothers me because I usually want to answer with a series of questions before I offer an answer. With this and the following two blog posts, I offer my response — but not without a clear bottom-line-up-front disclaimer:

YOUR STATEMENT IS USELESS IF IT DOESN’T COME AFTER A DEEP COMMITMENT HAS BEEN MADE.

The #1 element of a good DEI statement is that it follows a true and deep commitment to the long, never-ending, difficult work of embedding equity into every aspect of what you do and how you do it. Your DEI statement should be the child of your equity commitment — it doesn’t work the other way around, friends.

So, with that off my chest, in my next blog I will list the remaining elements I like to see in a solid DEI statement.

 

Olanike Ayomide-Mensah, CEO, Mosaic Consulting

Olanike is a strategist and executor rolled into one, experienced in applying the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) lens to all aspects of workplace management and at any stage of DEI development. Her 20+ years of experience spans corporate and non-profit organizations operating at local, national, and international levels. Learn more »

 

Trending

FEATURED COURSE

Disrupting Workplace Inequity

Empower your diversity, equity and inclusion advocacy. Learn where and why top DEI inhibitors exist or re-emerge. Apply proven practices to remedy and prevent unconscious bias and gatekeeping.

Coming Soon


Instructor-Led Course

3-Weeks Online
8hrs Est. Course time
Peer-group Networking